Sistapreneur of the Day: Khaleeqa “Roxi” Rouse of Paparouxi.com

 

 

As the unemployment rate remains high for African Americans—more than 15%— many workers are forced to find other ways to make ends meet. Some have been forced to face harsh realities about their lifestyle, their budgets, their passions and what really matters at the end of the day.

 

For Website entrepreneur and health advocate Khaleeqa “Roxi” Rouse, unemployment sparked a holistic change in her life, from her health to her self-esteem to her career path. After downsizing, soul-searching and taking an honest look at her definition of happiness, she decided to start Paparoxi.com, a hub focused on helping people tap into healthy, purposeful living that features insights and tips on fitness, food and fun.

 

Check out how she did it, why pursuing your passion is the best route and how you can turn the stigma of unemployment into the opportunity of a lifetime.

http://www.blackenterprise.com/2012/01/24/triumphing-over-unemployment-how-a-young-woman-made-her-boss-move/

Article Courtesy of Blackenterprise.com

Credit Building Services Can Be a Valuable Investment

Should your hire someone to help build your business credit? Credit-building services aren’t absolutely necessary, but they can be very helpful to stressed-out business owners.

It’s true that building business credit is not rocket science, but it can be a time-consuming process that detracts from successfully running your business. Companies like Platinum Corporate Credit (www.platinumcorporatecredit.com), Build Small Business Credit (www.buildsmallbusinesscredit.com), and Your Biz Credit (www.yourbizcredit.com) offer full-service programs that walk new business owners through every step of the process.

Keep in mind that these services do not come cheap. A typical credit building program can cost upwards of $500.

How effective are these services? Like anything else, customers report both good and bad experiences. Platinum Corporate Credit says that the average client finishes its program in nine months with 15 accounts, $150,000 in business credit, and an “A” credit rating established under their company name.

There are also credit reporting agencies that will monitor your personal credit and notify you of any changes for a monthly fee. These services can be a wise investment because they allow you to fix problems right away, and potentially nip suspicious activity and identity fraud in the bud.

Companies that offer credit monitoring services include Dun & Bradstreet (www.dnb.com), the parent company of all business; Experian (www.experian.com); and CreditReport.com (www.creditreport.com). These services allow you to keep a close eye on changes to your report and review your company’s credit file for completeness and accuracy, which could ultimately impact your ability to obtain credit.

A credit monitoring service could also help you determine who is reporting your payment habits and who is inquiring about your business.

Some monitoring services go a layer deeper and strive to help improve your credit scores and rating. A program from D&B called ScoreBuilder, for instance, gives you before and after snapshots of your company’s credit file. These snapshots give you a clearer understanding of how your business partners are making decisions on your company and how you can use your company’s strengths to negotiate better terms.

Business owners know that time is money. A reputable credit service will build your score, while you spend time growing your business.

 

Article Courtesy of Dun & Bradstreet

Macy’s Retail Training Program Boosts Savvy Sistapreneurs

Macy’s knows that its customers reflect the broad range of ethnicities that compose the American landscape. More than half of its customers in top markets are minorities, according to Businessweek. Macy’s also knows that it’s a challenge for  small businesses to get contracts with the department store behometh. To reconcile and address these two facts, Macy’s created a training program to encourage and mold minority vendors for the chain.

It’s a win-win situation for minority business owners and Macy’s, which seeks to better service its demographic. According according to the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth, Black buying power will expand by about a quarter, to $1.2 trillion by 2015: ”Macy’s forecasts its sales of goods from minority- and women-owned businesses will jump to $1 billion in two years, after rising a projected 22 percent, to $683.2 million, in 2011.” Source

To deliver the training course, Macy’s partnered with Boston-area school Babson college and coordinated a four-and-a-half-day course taught largely by Macy’s executives including Lisa Price, whose Carol Daughters’ products are sold in Macy’s stores.

The program received over 250 applications, from which 22 finalists were selected to participate. Applicants had to submit two years of financial information, product lists, and photos. Classes included lessons on the art of markdowns, supply chains, and raising financial backing.

Four of its graduates received contracts with Macy’s in November – two of the women were African-American entrepreneurs. Kim Roxie, founder of Lamik, will be selling her line of  cosmetics which focuses on “problem-solving” make-up and kits. Her products will be sold in Macys’s stores in Texas, Louisiana and online. Monif Clarke of Monif C. also got tapped to sell her line of  plus-size apparel.

Both brands have generated a lot of buzz in the past couple of years and this Macy’s program has proven to give them an extra boost, rather than a foundation, by which to expand their businesses.

Article Courtesy of Madame Noire Business

Sistapreneurs You Should Know!!

Tracey Edmonds

The founder and CEO of Act One Personnel Services, Janice Bryant Howroyd started the company  in 1978 with just $1,500. Today Act One is worth a reported $500 million and provides staffing solutions for corporations across the U.S. In fact it is said to be the largest certified woman minority-owned staffing company in the nation. Known as a visionary and pioneer among black women in business, Howroyd stands by the belief that people do their best work when their personal strengths are both nurtured and challenged.

Sheila Johnson

Sheila C. Johnson is not a household name, but few black households can say they’ve never heard of her contribution to television. She is the co-founder of Black Entertainment Television, better known as BET and was the creator of award winning program “Teen Summit”. But when her ex-husband Bob Johnson made the call to sell BET to Viacom, they both became billionaires. With her earnings Johnson founded and became CEO of Salamander Hospitality, LLC in 2005. Those lucky enough to enjoy the oasis get to relax at the Woodlands Inn in Summerville, South Carolina, Innisbrook,  a 72-hole Golf & Spa Resort in Innisbrook, Florida, and the Salamander Resort & Spa, in Middleburg, Virginia.

 

Janice Byrant Howroyd

 

The founder and CEO of Act One Personnel Services, Janice Bryant Howroyd started the company  in 1978 with just $1,500. Today Act One is worth a reported $500 million and provides staffing solutions for corporations across the U.S. In fact it is said to be the largest certified woman minority-owned staffing company in the nation. Known as a visionary and pioneer among black women in business, Howroyd stands by the belief that people do their best work when their personal strengths are both nurtured and challenged.

Iman

The founder and CEO of Act One Personnel Services, Janice Bryant Howroyd started the company  in 1978 with just $1,500. Today Act One is worth a reported $500 million and provides staffing solutions for corporations across the U.S. In fact it is said to be the largest certified woman minority-owned staffing company in the nation. Known as a visionary and pioneer among black women in business, Howroyd stands by the belief that people do their best work when their personal strengths are both nurtured and challenged.

Real Atlanta Housewife and Savvy Sistapreneur, Kandi Burrus, Launches New Sex Toy Line

If you thought the “Real Housewives” couldn’t get any more naughty, think again. Atlanta housewife Kandi Burruss has launched her own line of sex toys.

“They are happiness and joy,” Kandi told me of her new toy line, Bedroom Kandi, on the set of my talk show “Naughty But Nice with Rob.” “We have one button if you choose you can connect it to your stereo or mp3 [player], iPod or whatever and that vibrates to whatever song is playing on the stereo system.”

An accomplished performer and writer, Kandi has her own spin-off special airing on Bravo in February called “The Kandi Factory.” On the show, the Real Housewife will take struggling performers and make them over as artists — but for now, Kandi is focusing on helping folks make beautiful music in the bedroom.

“This is how you tell if it’s a good vibrator or not,” explains Kandi. “You tell how strong it is by the tip of your nose. Most people like them as gifts because it’s different. It’s great and it’s wireless and rechargeable — no batteries needed.”

Now, I’ll never be able to listen to any of the singing housewives without wondering what’s plugged into their mp3 or iPod.

For more information check out Bedroom Kandi By Kandi Burruss

 

Story Courtesy of Huffington Post

Sistapreneur of the Day: Angela Benton

Company: Cued
Age: 30
Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Four years ago, I was trying to do research before my first day at a new job about what black-focused companies were doing in the tech space. I checked all the tech blogs, and I could barely find anything — even about big companies like BET, which is owned by Viacom.

In response, I started Black Web 2.0 in 2007. It’s solely about what African-Americans are doing in technology and new media. It really took off and developed a strong community that exists to this day.

Wayne Sutton was an early reader, and he and I developed a relationship via social media. We talked a lot about how it seemed like people were waiting for something. That they felt physically disconnected from the strong startup environment in Silicon Valley. That people needed someone to step up.

We got the idea of creating a “startup house” to get people out to California, and that eventually morphed into NewMe. Wayne and I put the whole thing together in three months, which shows how well we work together as a team.

Running the accelerator and my own startup has been a lot to balance, and some days are better balanced than others. I’m working on Cued, an app that gives you recommendations based on where you are, what you like and your past experiences. For example, if you tell Cued that you like a specific bar and you also like karaoke and draft beer, the system will make recommendations for more places you’ll like. -As told to CNNMoney staff reporter Julianne Pepitone

Source: Article Courtesy of CNN Money

Sistapreneur of the Day: Lisa Price, Founder of Carol’s Daughter

 

Meet Lisa Price, entrepreneur and successful businesswoman. Price serves as Founder and President of Carol’s Daughter, a natural beauty and hair care company she started over ten years ago. Her creative vision, direction and untiring commitment to producing quality products has allowed her to turn her once small home-based business into a multi-million dollar a year company.

With innovative ideas in beauty and hair care, her company has seen great success through initiatives such as a partnership deal with Sephora, and high-profile celebrity endorsements and campaigns featuring Mary J. Blige, Jade Pinkett Smith and Cassie to name a few. A trailblazer who’s revolutionized the beauty industry, Price tells us how she continues to expand the brand of Carol’s Daughter. Find out why she’s the boss.

Article Courtesy of Madame Noir